History

Please use the menu on the left to view the images and short description of the history of MG cars. This information has been split into time periods.

If you have any great MG images that you would like to see or share here please send by email or post to MG Car Club, PO Box 3135, Wellington, New Zealand. Thank you.

A History of the MG Car Company and Cecil Kimber

Cecil KimberIn 1922, 33-year-old Cecil Kimber joined Morris Garage as sales manager, to be appointed as general manager in the following year. Kimber had a great interest in body styling and coach building and was also an enthusiastic sports car driver. At the time, the Bullnosed Morris Cowleys and Oxfords were the best-selling cars in Britain, but were undeniably staid. So, it became natural for Kimber to turn his skills to fitting Morris chassis with a special bodywork of a more sporting nature.

The first cars that could be attributed to Cecil Kimber and Morris Garage were built in 1922. The development of the MG Marque is one of the success stories in automotive history. The MG became the everyday man's sports car. Affordable and fun. Even to this day the MG sports cars have a mystic all to themselves and those of us who love our cars have a responsibility to see that younger car lovers are introduced to the enjoyment and pleasure of ownership of MG cars that we currently have.

William Morris , later Lord Nuffield, and founder of Morris Garage had the wisdom and insight to make Cecil Kimber managing director of the MG Car Company. The MG logo first appeared in the year 1924 inside the famous octagon shape.

In 1923, the first special-bodied Morris cars were marketed by Morris Garages, and in March 1924 the first MG car - a four-door saloon body on a Morris Oxford chassis – was advertised. It was followed immediately by the first examples of the MG four-seater Special Sports, also on the Oxford chassis.

Old No. 1The marque was first used in 1924 in a bull nosed sports car, now affectionately name Old Number One. This formed the basis of the MG Car Company, with Lord Nuffield at its head. In 1922 management of the MG Car Company was taken over by Cecil Kimber. Kimber was an avid motor sports enthusiast and is also credited for introducing the classic radiator style recognizable on so many cars such as the T-Series MG's.

For 1925 a range of MG Super Sports models were offered, with two or four seater bodywork, or in 'salonette' form. In the same year the first entirely special purpose built MG sports, 'Old No. 1' was made for Cecil Kimber's own use. Kimber entered the car in the 1925 Land's End Trial and won a gold medal.

Formed in 1928 the MG Car Company made it's premier showing of two new MG Midgets in the year 1928 1928 at the London Motor Show. Following that appearance the production of MGs tripled with the MG M type Midget accounting for more than 50% of the company's production. In 1930 the company relocated to its factory and works in Abingdon. And it was during this time the the MG slogan "Safety Fast" was born.

MG Ex135 The period 1930 to 1935 saw the classic MG years, with a great variety of four and six cylinder models being manufactured. Most were sports cars, although a number of pure racing models were also developed and won countless successes on race tracks and road circuits in Britain and abroad. The name MG became synonymous with sports cars and it was in this period that the foundations were made for the lasting fame of the marquee.

MG Ex181 Until 1935, the MG company had been the sole property of Lord Nuffield. However, in that year he sold the company together with Wolseley and his other interests to Morris Motors Ltd as part of a general rationalisation of the Morris companies, forming the Nuffield Organisation. It was simultaneously announced that MG would withdraw from racing. However, although there were no more MG racing cars, the company entered a new field of achievement with a series of record cars. The first was the EW120, the 'Magic Midget' which George Eyston drove at over 100 mph. This was followed by the EX135, the 'Magic Magnette' which was rebuilt with streamlined bodywork and in the course of its 15 year career, broke numerous records in different capacity classes, using five different engines.


In 1936 the MG Car Company made a dramatic change in the design of their sports cars. In this year they introduced the MGTA Midget. The MGTA originated the familiar T-Series design element and to the casual observer, it is hard to distinquish from the MGTC. The MGTA sported the famous radiator design, the swept wings, running boards, folding windscreen, and large accessible bonnet. It was a two seater sports car with a foldable hood and side curtains. Just over 3,000 MGTA's were produced in three years of production. The MGTA suffered from a poor performing engine and in 1939 the MGTB was introduced with the now famous XPAG engine. Only a few were produced as in a few months World War II broke out.

MG TC 1936During World War II production of MG's ceased as the MG Car Company was put into service for the war effort making tanks and airplane parts, and other military items. When the war ended the MG Car Company was anxious to get back to making sports cars. They revisited the MGTB and made a few subtle changes. These were in the form of a wider body and shackles replacing sliding trunnions for the spring mounts. The Nuffield Organization also made another drastic change. They started taking an active interest in selling their sports cars in North America. It appears that during the War a number of American GI's had an opportunity to experience the T-Series MG's. When the War ended a number of these cars were imported and then formally sold into North America, especially the United States. The MGTC was produced from 1945 to 1949 with a total production of about 10,000 cars.

Photo from the National Museum, UK.Due to the fact that the United States had much more cash available to spend on entertainment and sports than did war-torn Britain, the Nuffield Organization made a drastic change in their marketing, focusing on North America. In 1949 the MGTC was fitted with many elements to make it more North American such as front and rear bumpers, twin horns, and dual tail lamps. Even by making these changes only a fraction of the MGTC's were imported into North America. There were still too many issues with a car of this type for different North America conditions. Amongst those were driving on the right hand side of the road rather than the left, more high speed maneuvers such as freeways, a softer ride, and some additional creature comforts. What was needed was a total redesign of the MGTC if the MG Car Company was to capture a significant portion of the North American market. What was missing was a total commitment from the Nuffield Organization to do so.

The Nuffield Organization not only owned the MG Car Company but a number of other marques as well, often competing with MG over the years. These included Morris and Riley. At times it seemed that MG could never get the resources they needed to become world leaders in the marketplace. Not only were they competing with the likes of Triumph and Austin, but the real battle seemed to go on internally in the Nuffield Organization. This continued right through the merger of Nuffield and Austin in 1952 which formed the British Motor Company (BMC). MG's were produced in Abingdon, England from the early 1930's until production ceased in 1980. Other cars from the Nuffield organization were also produced at Abingdon during the years and vied for precious resources.

In 1949 a small group of MG leaders, headed by John Thornley, got together to try to create a car that was acceptable to the North American marketplace while at the same time would limit the investment of the Nuffield Organization. Clearly it would be impossible to completely create a new car, not only from a financial point but from a timing standpoint as well. What was needed was a little of the old, sprinkled with a little of the new. Another key factor was to borrow or incorporate features found in other Nuffield cars of the time that were more up to date than the MGTC.

First it was decided to start with the MGTC. It was felt that the MGTC still provided a favorable brand image to the North American marketplace. Many elements of the MGTC were still believed to be important such as the styling, Safety Fast engineering, the powertrain and the familiarity of design.

What was missing was more futuristic styling, better turning and handling, a smoother ride, left hand drive and more creature comforts such as an optional heater and radio.

Quickly a team of MG personnel took inventory of the components of the Nuffield Organization that they had to work with. They discarded the TC's frame because it was to light and not rigid enough. They found what they wanted in the Y types. A small modification to the frame was to have it sweep over the rear axle rather than under. This gave them more travel in the rear springs so they could increase the damping. In addition they adopted rack and pinion steering and front coil springs and wishbones. This and the change in rear end suspension allowed for a smoother ride and better handling than the MGTC. One of the major changes was to reduce the wheel size from 19 inches to 15 inches and increase the tire width to 5.50. All of these changes made the MGTD a superior riding car over the MGTC

MG TD Because of the use of the larger frame the body became 5 inches wider. Although the body increased by 5 inches, only one inch actually found it's way into the cockpit so there is an indiscernible difference in the seating width. The biggest change that people notice about the MGTD from the MGTC is the lack of wire wheels. As part of the Nuffield cost cutting challenge the more expensive wire wheels of former T-Series cars were replaced by solid steel wheels. For the entire production run of the MGTD the factory took heat for this decision. They constantly tried to create implausible technical reasons why wire wheels would not work but the marketplace never accepted their reasons. In fact wire wheels were one of the most popular aftermarket accessories at the time.

Other changes between the MGTC and the MGTD were more stylized wings, partially due to the smaller wheels. A dual production capable LHD or RHD model, better brakes, adjustable steering column, and an interchangeable dashboard for left or right hand driving were also incorporated. An optional radio and heater, as well as many accessories designed to improve the performance of the car were made available.

The original MGTD was first produced in late 1949 and had it's formal introduction in January of 1950. There were a total of four model years; 1950, 1951, 1952, and 1953. The first model set the stage for what the MGTD was. Because of the short amount of time from the inception of the MGTD to the delivery of the first cars, not everything was quite as the MG Car Company would have liked it. In fact they were still making MGTC's on the production line when the first MGTD's were produced. Other models were also being made on the same assembly line at the same time. This says something of the flexibility of the Abingdon work crews and factory. The MGTD was offered in three models although no more than two were ever available at one time. Most changes to these early MGTD's were unnoticeable from the untrained eye.

One exception to this was the change from solid wheels to slotted wheels. Still steel and not wire, but a change nothing else. Most of this seems to be precipitated from the fact that the brakes were fading due to poor cooling. Another change was to stiffen the body by adding an internal under firewall tubular frame. It helped but the MGTD body bucket still seems to flex quite a bit when pressed into corners. Nuffield had to offer an upgrade kit to wire wheels during 1953 because the essentially identical 1954 MGTF chassis sported wire wheels as an option.

In 1952 Nuffield and Austin merged to form British Motor Corporation (BMC). This gave MG an in house family rival in the form of the Austin Healey sports car and in 1957 Austin-Healey production was transferred to Abingdon.

During the 1980’s, the MG versions of the Metro, Maestro and the Montego were produced. These models were very successful, but were progressively phased out as derivative offerings were rationalised.

It wasn't always an Octogan

About 1928 the badge was enamelled.

The 1980's and current badge.

1970s Badges

Factory Yard


1920

Description

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11.9 HP Raworth 'Chummy' OLD No 1

The first of the breed, won a class in the 1925 Lands End Trial, not technically the first MG, but down in history as certainly one of the most famous.

During Mid 1923 - late 1924, 6 were produced and none are known to exist It was the first car to be advertised as an M.G. Super Sports Morris. An 11.9hp Morris Cowley fitted with a 2-seater body supplied by Charles Raworth & Sons of Oxford. With a 1548cc straight four side valve engine it is believed to have had only one horizontal SU carburettor. A wet cork clutch and a 3 speed crash gearbox, 1/2 elliptic front springs 3/4 elliptic front springs (shackled), bolt on artillery wheels and brakes with 9" drums to the rear only. The wheelbase was 8' 6" and the track 4' 0". It was only available as a 2-seater.

Raworth 'Chummy'

14/28 Super Sports (Bullnose Radiator)

Approximately 400 were produced from late 1924 to late 1926 wre made with mainly polished aluminium, and 2 tone paint later in the prod run, 2 - 4 seats, open or closed versions were produced with about only 10 surviving today.

The 1802cc four cyclinder side valve engine had a single carburettor, which could be a Smith, SU or Solex. A wet cork clutch connected a three speed manual crash gearbox, 1/2 elliptic front springs and 3/4 elliptic rear springs, in 1924/5 bolt on artillery wheels with Ace discs and in 1925/6 bolt on wire spoke wheels, 12" drum brakes, the wheel base was 8' - 6" and later 9' - 0", the track was 4' - 0".

14/28 Super Sports

14/28 & 14/40 Mark IV (Flat Radiator)

Based on a Morris Oxford about 900 flat rad 14/28 and 14/40 were made between late 1926 and late 1929 in open tourer and closed evrsions. Approx 22 survive. Both the 14/28 and the 14/40 had a 1802cc four cyclinder side valve engine with a single horizontal Solex carburettor, a wet cork clutch and three speed manual crash gearbox, 1/2 elliptic springs front and rear, bolt on wire wheels and 12" drum brakes. The wheel base was 8' - 10 1/2" and the track 4' - 0".

14/40 Mark IV

M Type

Kimber's original sports car for the masses, 3,000 made, 1928 - 1932, the 1st MG to be made at Abingdon, based on the 1st "Morrie Minor", 2 seater boat tail, 847 cc overhead cam, the beginning of the MG future.

M Type

MG 18/80 Six Mk 1

The 1st 6 cyl MG, 500 were built from late 1928 - mid 1931 with approximately 32 survivors. These motorcars were built firstly at Edmund Road, Oxford until M.G. moved to Abingdon in September 1929. They have a 2468cc, straight six overhead camshaft engine, with two horizontal SU carburettors with a single float chamber, a wet cork clutch, a manual 3 speed crash gearbox, torque tube to the rear axle, shackled 1/2 elliptic springs front and rear, 12" finned drum brakes. Early models had rod brakes with Perrot shafts to the front and later models had cable brakes, they have 19" Rudge Whitworth centre lock wirewheels a wheelbase of 9' - 6" and a track of 4' - 0".

MG 18/80 Six

MG 18/80 Six Mk 11

Of the 236 Mk11's built at Abingdon from 1930 to late 1933 about 25 exist today.

They were similar to the Mk1 with the 2468cc engine but had a wider track of 4' - 4", a beefed up chassis, a four speed gearbox, a different rear axle, different brakes with 14" drums, different headlamp mountings (the easiest way to tell the difference from a Mk1), the twin SU carburettors had two float chambers and there were several other minor changes.

MG 18/80 Six

18/100 Six Mk 111 Tigress

Known as the Tigress just 5 were built with only 2 known survivors. Originally built to compete with the Bentleys at Brooklands it was unsuccessfull as it was too heavy. Based on the new 18/100 Mk 11 chassis it was fitted with the 18/80 power unit but incorporating a new crankshaft and pistons, a new camshaft, dry-sump lubrication, a cross flow head with twin sparking plugs, new unique carburettors and a host of other improvements including a higher second gear. The chassis had a modified steering box mounting, additional shock absorbers at the rear and a larger fuel tank. The Mk 11 brakes were modified only slightly. The body was similar to the speed models but had cycle wings and conformed to the racing requirements of the day. This motorcar was catalogued as the M.G. Six Sports Road Racing Model. There are a few 'lookalike' Tigresses, built from Mk11 cars.

18/100 Six

1920's - 30's

Description

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C Type Midget

A racing success with it's 750cc motor in H Class, ran in the 1931 24 hr race at Brooklands with 5 cars in the 1st 5 places! Known as the Montlhery Midget after Eyston's records at the French track. 44 made through to 1932.

C Type Midget

Now that's an exhaust to admire!A lovely little C Type being driven with verve in a New Zealand Rally.

C Type Midget

D Type Midget

A four seater based on the C Type, 847cc, 3 spd, remote shifter, longer than the C, made 250 from 1931 - 1932

D type Midget

Magna F & L

6 cyl 1271cc engine, 4 spd box, a stretched Midget, 1,250 made to 1932. The L type in 1933, was 1987cc 6 cyl, made 676 of to 1934.

Magna F & L

F Type

Competing in a pre 56 MG Rally in New Zealand. Normally used with both doors shut!

F Type

K Magnette

Last of the pre-war OHC's, 1087cc, enabled 1100 cc class racing, 86 made, later 1933 cars went to 1271cc and more power.

K Magnette

K3 Magnette

The famous racing K3!
Supercharged 1087cc swb version, 33 made and were immortalised for their raid on the Mille Miglia, 1st and 2nd in class in 1933. Variety of body styles, all great!

K3 Magnette

The famous racing K3!

An inspiring body line.

K3 Magnette

J Type Midget

1932 36hp from 846cc, they all raced with superchargers, a wonderful little car, some 2,500 made which was the most popular MG since the M type.

J Type Midget

J Type Midget

N & K Magnettes

1934 more sedate body style, 1271cc, 56hp 6 cyl, some 1,000 made in various guises, an elegant MG.

N & K Magnettes

P Type Midget

A very sensual shape for 1934 and still is, 847cc going up to 939cc, 2,500 made to 1936. Immortalised through the "Cream Cracker" racing team colours.

P Type Midget

A lovely cutaway drawing, I found somewhere > > >

A lovely car caught on an MG Rally in New Zealand, (don't know when or even whose, but it's nice).

P Type Midget

P Type Midget

An inside view of the period style.

P Type Midget

Q Type

A very rapid racing MG, did Q stand for quick? Only 8 made in 1934 with 150hp from their supercharged 750cc. A truly wonderful car.

Q Type

R Type

The last pre-war racing MG. Aluminium backboned all independent, wishbone suspension. The only single seater MG. Just stunning and one of my absolute favourites! 10 only made, and there is one under restoration here in NZ.

R Type

SA 2 litre

A beautiful flowing body, made 2,738 of them to 1939. 4 seater and drop-head coupe, long wheelbase with sensuous lines, with 4 doors, ohv engine, hydraulic brakes.

SA 2 litre

VA 1.5 litre

1548cc, small 4 seater, smooth, quiet but a bit slow they say. Very pretty, made 2,407 to 1939.

VA 1.5 litre

WA 2.6 litre

Impressive is the way to describe these ones, large 6 cyl, 369 made to 1939 in several body styles. WA 2.6 litre

1940's - 50's

Description

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TA Midget

Last of the pre-war Midgets, pushrod ohv 1,292cc, 52hp, 4 spd, Made 3,003 from 1936 to 1939. Race bred success.

TA Midget

TB Midget

Released in 1939, 1250cc, dry clutch, only 379 made before the war intervened and Abingdon became a munitions factory.

St Davids Church at Cave in South Canterbury. Thanks Susan & Peter

TB Midget

St Davids Church at Cave in South Canterbury. Thanks Susan & Peter

TC Midget - An MGTC special in New Zealand

The most popular MG ever, 10,000 made with some 70% exported, mainly to the USA. Lovely cars and a favourite of many MG worshippers.

TC Midget

An MGTC special in New Zealand

TC Midget

Y Type

1st post war sedan, TC engine, 46hp, YA & YB to 1953 sold 7,458. YT 2 door open 4 seater; only made 1,000 to 1949.

Vineyard cruise in Marlborough, NZ.

Y Type

TD Midget

One of my favourites with its independent front end, 57hp, 1250cc and much easier to drive in a straight line, 30,000'ish made.

TD Midget

TF Midget

A streamlined TD, not that popular then, but very much so now. 6,200 of the 1250cc made then another 3,400 of the 1500cc to 1955. XPEG engine.

TF Midget

Arnolt

An Italian bodied MGTD, made for Mr Arnolt in the U.S.A. Simply beautiful.

Made in limited numbers, open and closed versions, total of I think 64.

One open car resides in NZ, patiently awaiting it's turn for restoration.

Arnolt

Arnolt

Z Type Magnette

1st chassis-less, monocoque MG. Released in 1953, with the new 1489cc, 4 door. ZB came in 68hp power. 36,000 sold to 1958. An under-rated MG with quiet style.

Pictured in ZB varitone version.

Z Type Magnette

MGA 1500

With the ZB's B series 1500 cc engine it was the 1st enveloping body MG. Roadster or coupe versions.

Huge success with nearly 60,000 sold to 1959.

MGA 1500

A very nice NZ example of the genre.

MGA 1500

MGA Twin Cam

A derivative, but deserving of it's own space. 1588cc 198hp @ 6,700 rpm. Came out in 1958, 2,111 made, a potent race car.

Had a delicate motor in it's day, but modern oils etc cured all that, very collectable indeed.

MGA Twin Cam

MGA 1962 Roadster

A timeless classic, 1622cc, 4 cylinder. Also made in twin-cam & coupe and deluxe with 4 wheel disc brakes.

Very collectible in all it's forms, some might say it's the last of the real MGs.

Photos at right taken during the Queenstown Pre-56 Rally last century (1999). P51 Mustang belonging to Tim Wallis as part of his Warbirds collection. Thank you 'Miss Torque'.

MGA 1962 Roadster

MGA 1962 Roadster

MGA Coupe

A very elegant body, limited numbers produced, many fine examples exist today.

MGA Coupe

New Zealand

A line up of A's at a MGA 40th birthday party in Taumaranui, NZ.

New Zealand MGs

Magnette Mk III & IV

Farina MG's, with straight lines and fins! 1959 to 1961 with 1489cc then with 1622cc engines, 28,000 in all made to 1968.

Badge engineering at it's "best" but still a nice car and rare as many went to heaven via demolition derbys.

Magnette Mk III & IV

1960's

Description

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Midget

MG's 1st monocoque sports car, originally 948cc, then 1098 still with 1/4 elliptic springs. 7,000 made.

Very much a Frog-Eye with new bodywork.

Midget

Midget MkII

26,000 made to 1966, moved to 1/2 elliptic rear springs.

Right - Paul Woodley's Midget at the site of the Clyde dam in around 1987.

Midget MkII

Midget MkIII

Made from 1966 to 1972, some 170,000 in all, 1,275 cc motor.

Midget MkIII

Midget MkIV - RWA

Round wheel arch, 1275, about 100,000 made. BL badged.

Midget MkIV - RWA

Midget MkIV - RWA

Midget MKV

Transplanted Triumph 1500 motor in the very worst days of Triumph/MG merger, as well as "gaining" American rubber bumpers. 72,000 made.

Midget MKV

Midget in Action

An excellent example of a Midget being used in anger. Piloted by a well-known MG man, Graham Collett.

This time on the grass at a New Zealand MG National Rally weekend. Also well-used, with good success in Racing and Rallies.

Midget in Action

MG1100/1300

Badge version of the 1100 range, 1098 & 1275cc versions, 140,000 made, not many left, much maligned but not a bad car at all.

MG1100/1300

MGB

The classic sportscar for the masses. Launched in 1962 with a 3 bearing engine, 4 speed, 3 synchro, 1798cc, and became an instant icon. 5 bearing motor from 1965. "Chrome bumpers" until 1974.

MGB

MGB

MGB GT

Pininfarina closed coupe version of the MGB Roadster. Very successful, many 1,000s of them are still in daily use today.

MGB GT

MGB GT

MGC & MGCGT

The distinctive bonnet bulge revealed the high straight 6cyl 2912cc, 145hp engine, which made it a bit front end heavy to drive.

Torsion bar front suspension.

About 9,000 made, hard to find now.

MGC & MGCGT

MGBGT V8 1973-1974

Rover 3.5 V8, only 2,591 real ones produced, 137hp, 4 speed and o/drive on top only.

Very sought after in this condition.

MGBGT V8 1973-1974

Rover 2.5 V8 shoehorned in. Only downside is long inlets from twin SUs.

Rover 2.5 V8 shoehorned in

MG & BGT 1975-80

The "rubber" bumper models, designed to meet USA saftey regulations.

Not as well regarded, but in many ways a very nice usable machine.

MG & BGT 1975-80

Moderns

Description

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Metro 1300

A BL badge effort. Made from 1982 to 1989, not that pretty, but quite a good car in their own way.

Metro 1300

Metro Turbo

Turbo 1275, 93 hp, very quick, but a bit fragile as a few found out with all that extra power.

Metro Turbo

6R4

A wild rally built machine with rear mounted V6, 4 wheel drive.

Wickedly fast, still being used today in anger.

6R4

Maestro

Made in 1600 & 2.0 litre versions to 1989. Very few in NZ, but those that are in good hands.

Maestro

Montego

In 1994cc mode with or without a turbo, FWD sedan and much better than their reputation, ask somebody with one.

From Motobuild UK's website - one serious Montego turbo!

Montego

RV8

A modern B, as it might have been, Only 2,200 made, 1,400 ish went to Japan.

About 10 have arrived in NZ before the clobbering machine won through. 3.9 Rover V8, under 6.0 secs to 100k, best of English interior.

Forerunner for the re-release of MG via the MGF.

RV8

A few shots of aspects of the RV8.

RV8

RV8

MGF 1.8i

Much fuss at the launch in 1995, K series aluminium, rear mounted engine. A very modern MG in my favourite colour. Great marketing success. now firmly established as a new MG of style.

MGF 1.8i

MGF 1.8i

MGF 1.8i

MGF VVC

As above but with very clever and complicated variable cam timing, likely to be replaced with a supercharged regular cam motor in 1999 - it wasn't!

MGF VVC

MGF VVC

The New Generation

MG3

The all-new, exciting and slightly cheeky MG3 offers more fun and value for money than any other car in the highly competitive supermini sector of the market.

Like the MG ZERO, the MG3 was largely designed and engineering by highly talented professionals at the MG Birmingham site in Longbridge. After the MG6, the MG3 becomes the second in a new generation of British designed and engineered MG models.

The MG3 is unmistakable on the road. It takes the iconic MG brand another step into the future.

Click HERE for more information on the MG3

MG6

MG is a brand with a famous history and an exciting future and the launch of the eagerly awaited MG6 GT sports fastback marks the beginning of a new era.

The car was designed by a team led by Tony Williams-Kenny and the
engineering and development team was led by David Lindley. Both the Design Centre and the Technical Centre are based at the MG Birmingham site where final assembly of the MG6 GT also takes place.

A UK design and engineering staff of more than 300 professionals are based at the Birmingham operation. MG is owned by the SAIC Motor which is the largest automotive company in China and the 8th largest in the world.  Click HERE for more

EX's

Description

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EX 172

Built by Syd Enever to run at the 1951 Le Mans, it could do 120mph. This is not an MGA, but is a rebodied MG based on the MG TD with a tuned engine and lightened chassis.

The success of EX 172 in 1952 development led ultimately to the MGA.

EX 172

EX 175

EX175, was again based on a modified TD chassis and mechanicals but with a beautiful streamlined bodyshell which was right up-to-date. Sadly, it was to be turned down flatly by the boss of the now British Motor Corporation as a deal had already been signed to build a similar car - the Austin-Healey 100.

EX 175

EX 181

Record breaker In 1500cc supercharged mode it did 204.2 in 1957. It also did 245.6 mph in 1957 with Stirling Moss at the wheel with an over-bored 1506cc supercharged motor.

Ex 181

EX 182

Le Mans special, based on radical MGA, did well in their classes in 1955.

EX 182

EX 186

Research said "Still-born due to racing demise, based on MGA in wild trim with twin cam, and alloy body, no car exists today."

In 1999 I was contacted from the U.S.A. by 'Joe' the man who has EX186 in his garage and care!

Fantastic and a real surprise. The power of the Web community rules.

NEWS: Newly renovated and out to play, latest pics June 2006.

EX 186

EX 186

EX 186

Ex 186

EX 135

1934 was the year, K3 was the basis, achieved flying mile at 128.7 mph. Made famous by "Goldie" Gardner.

A K3 with a new Zoller motor did 148.8 mph in 1937, when this motor was fitted to EX135 it managed 204.2 mph in the 1,500 class in 1939.

It had a variety of engines from 2 cyl 500cc, to 1500cc and did wondrous things.

EX 135

Fitted with a new streamlined body. Last ran at Bonneville in 1952 when Gardner was injured in a crash.

EX 135

EX 127

Nicknamed "Magic Midget".

With the later Q type motor it did 140.6 mph in 1936.

EX 127

EX 120

Based around the 750cc motor with supercharger, it managed 103.1 mph in 1931, at Montlhery.

Eyston very nearly burnt to death in this, but survived.

EX 120

EX 179

Eyston took this car with 1466cc engine to Bonneville in 1954 and did 153.6 mph Class F.

In 1956 in twin cam mode it did 170.1 mph.

With a 948cc supercharged engine it did 143.4 mph in 1957.

EX 179

EX-E

A wonderful prototype that if they had had the brains to produce would have saved the marque in the 80's.

Did it inspire the Honda NSX I wonder?

EX-E

MGF record EX-F

Based on a streamlined MGF in 1997 it managed a 217.4 mph run, with 1433 K Series supercharged 328 bhp mode at Bonneville.

MGF record EX-F

MGF record EX-F

MGF record EX-F

EX 255

EX 255 With a new rear sub-frame and twin supercharged 4.8 litre Rover V8, some 900 bhp.

Driven by Andy Green of Thrust SSC fame.

EX 255

EX 254 Concept

A concept model MGF Super Sports, released by Rover in 1998, "possibly" to be produced as a weekend race special.

Complete with puffer.

EX 254 Concept
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